Posts Tagged ‘guitar’


Album Cover for Roxette's Charm School (Image Via Wikipedia)

Although it is not set to be released  until April 18th, Roxette’s second single from their eighth studio album Charm School is destined to become a worldwide hit mainly because it reminds faithful fans of the band’s most famous songs from the 80s namely, It Must’ve Been Love and other songs from the Joyride age.

Many fans, like myself,  have taken to the internet to express their desire of having this song released as a single and thankfully, the duo have listened. No word on when and if a video will accompany the release, but regardless, this is a flawless song that can stand on its own, and can directly attract listeners despite its placement as the fourth track on the album, right after the very weak but enjoyable She’s Got Nothing On (But the Radio).

The Swedish duo, formed of Marie Fredriksson and Per Gessle have been making music for a while now but took a long, well-deserved ten-year break to work on their own projects and sadly, because Fredrikssion had brain cancer and has suffered some permanent damage to her cognitive abilities. Thankfully, she’s all better now and her vocal abilities are still intact, as demonstrated throughout the album.

Written and composed by Gessle, who is known to be a musical mastermind,  this song follows the tradition of vocals alternation that Roxette have been known for. Per’s smooth, lower register singing opens up the track, with Marie slightly doing back-up duties before the whole thing is transferred to her on the bridge. She does a stellar job here, with her contrasting high notes and incredible power in delivering the most important lines of the song. They continue to go back and forth, joining their voices together on the chorus to bring the whole song full circle.

Gessle does a great job in putting the music together. It’s definitely a rock song, with elements of electric guitar- especially at the end of the track as Fredriksson belts out the last note- drums, and some piano. The way he puts these together to make a fantastic rock-pop ballad is undoubtedly one of the strengths of this song. It’s no Listen to Your Heart however, but they’re not trying to do that anyways.

As for the lyrics, it’s about finding that one person who can be your consolance and hear you in times of distress, thus the speaker calls out to be spoken to about the significant other’s problems, with love, as the refrain keeps saying. Even though that person wants to hide, Fredrikission, in her very mighty voice, draws him near and eases him out of his vulnerability.

Would I recommend this song to someone who is just getting to know Roxette? Yes and No. Yes because the song is magnificent and such a breath of fresh air from everything we’re exposed today but no because they simply would not get what we’re all raving about. I would instead recommend that they take a listen to my ultimate favorite by this duo Listen to Your Heart or anything from their 80s body of work.

For fans of Roxette, this song will just reaffirm why we’ve fallen in love with Marie and Per and appreciate that a rare few make music like this today.


A greyscale illustration of a chimpanzee wearing a dress shirt, pants, and sunglasses. The animal is seen reclining, with his or her feet outstretched and in the foreground. In black, the words "The Lazy Song" appear in minuscule below the words "Bruno Mars" in majuscule font.

Single cover for Bruno Mars' The Lazy Song (Image via Wikipedia)

After he told you he loved you just the way you are, after he vowed to catch a grenade for you, after he jumped into a spur-of-the-moment-wedding with you, Bruno Mars now just wants to leave everything behind him, and have a long day at home doing, you guessed it, nothing.

Peter Hernandez, better known as Bruno Mars,  originally started off as a songwriter/producer in the Smeezingtons team, but has been flooding the airwaves since he collaborated with Travie McCoy on Billionaire in 2010. Though he’s vocally talented, I really can’t stand him because he’s pioneered “fiction-pop,” meaning that all of his songs have to do with something that won’t ever or very rarely come true. His latest single, now playing on all radio stations,  is no different.

Just like the title “The Lazy Song” suggests, the song is very laid back, mainly because its draws its elements from reggae music. It’s also heavily influenced by the general feel of Hawaii, where Mars hails from.

The guitar cords may seem very familiar because they’re very close to the ones he used on Billionaire and sounds very easy to play. Regardless of that, it’s still classified as a pop song because of it happens to be very catchy.

Unlike his past singles, Bruno makes no effort to hit any screechy high notes and just sticks to his simplistic approach towards things. This is a definite welcome change and keeps the song at its lovable state.

Lyrically, its fun and upbeat, and tackles on our everyday desire of just not being disturbed. As a college student, I can completely relate and there have been many, many days that I have felt this way or have stayed at home and not combed by hair.

He goes through all of the motions of a perfect lazy day like lying in bed, not picking up the phone, defying everyone, chilling, and being the king of his own castle- and that’s where his fiction pop kicks in. He’d rather blow off getting a college degree to be lazy- wow, that does not resonate well with me at all.

Though thew single has been released on February 15, the video is still not out yet, as is the case for Marry You, but I’ll be sure to keep you posted when it does. It’ll be very interesting to see how the approach he takes here is going to translate into visuals.

My final verdict? I really want to hate this song because it’s a Bruno Mars one and I really don’t like his style but it’s so catchy and spot-on that I’m very sure I’m going to keep replaying it over and over again as the summer approaches.

Here’s a clip of the song being performed acoustically via Billboard.com


In an industry where success is a fleeting notion, a career spanning over forty years is a marvelous and incredulous feat, something that Germany’s own hard-rock band Scorpions can show off with much pride. Through the highs, lows, and changing times, the band has always managed to produce wisely crafted songs that are instantly classified as theme songs for generations. The group, who are best known for anthems such as “Rock You Like a Hurricane,” “Wind of Change,” and “Still Loving You,” return to the scene after a three year absence to deliver their final effort before retirement.

Cover of

Cover of Sting in the Tail

Entitled “Sting in the Tail,” the 17th studio album is an obvious return to what the band has come to be known for over the span of their careers and clearly honors the legacy and fan-base that Scorpions have established.

The album begins with the reflective and appropriately titled “Raised on Rock.” From the opening note, the lead guitarist hits every rock note known in history, to give off the 80s feel that fans of the genre are all too familiar with. The opening lyric “I was born in a hurricane” seemingly alludes to the band’s signature song “Rock You like a Hurricane.” With the addition of the talk-box and consecutive drum beats, the song becomes instantly catchy and starts off the farewell party with a bang.

The title track, though not as attractive as its predecessor, is given credit for the hard-rock musical arrangement that almost all rock bands of today seem to lack. The guitar solo is the best of the whole album. Thematically, the song is about a budding rock star on the road, chasing after his dream.

“Slave Me,” yet another rock song, deals with lust and the overall effect is established due to lead singer Klaus Meine’s distinct vocal and heavy accent. “Let’s Rock,” follows a similar effect.

The first power ballad is track number four, “The Good Die Young,” featuring Finnish singer Tarja Turunen on background vocals. Beginning as a slow ballad, the music slowly ascends to become a powerful rock melody that catches on immediately. The lyrics are reminiscent of Aerosmith’s “Dream On” as they deal with making the most out of life.

“No Limit” is perhaps the best hard-hitting song, musically, lyrically, and vocally. On this track, listeners are given the sense of accomplishing anything while the music is bound to make anyone get up and play air-guitar. (more…)


Needing no introduction of any sort, Bon Jovi, the band that introduced the talk box into modern music dictionaries and produced songs such as “Living on a Prayer” which have become the theme to many people’s lives, have a new album out entitled “The Circle.”

The Circle (Bon Jovi album)

Album Cover

Their eleventh studio album marks their return back to their hard-rock roots, after their previous effort “Lost Highway” was heavily influenced by country sounds. To many, it does not completely sound like Bon Jovi of yesteryear, yet after a careful listen to all the tracks, it is evident that the spark and love for music that propelled the band to stardom in the first place has remained intact, even after 25 years of being on the scene. On this album, the boys from Jersey truly come to a full-circle.

The powerful first single “We Weren’t Born to Follow” kicks off the album with an inspiring message and a heavy musical arrangement. The infusion of successive drum beats, guitar arrangements, and Jon Bonjovi’s signature vocals propel the song forward and the listener may surprisingly find himself singing along from the first time.

“When We Were Beautiful” follows, and while the listener may think the band are slowing things down a bit too early on the album, the song is a far cry from being a sappy ballad. It is a song that chronicles what the group has been through in their music careers and what they have learned from that journey. The thought-provoking lyrics are sung to one the best guitar riffs of the entire album, courtesy of Ritchie Sambora.

The rock-anthem of “The Circle” comes in the form of “Work for the Working Man” which is an attestment to the working class, a recurring theme for Bon Jovi. The chant-along style and the easy lyrics are bound to get instant attention. (more…)


Multiple Grammy winner Norah Jones is back on the scene with her latest effort “The Fall,” proving she can be successful even with a slight diversion from her typical jazz style that made her famous in the first place. Her track list offers both ends of the spectrum, going from the extremely upbeat in the beginning to completely slowing things down towards the end.

Cover of

Cover of The Fall

By doing so, Jones gives her listeners a perfect and carefully chosen final product that is certain to keep many company on long, lonely nights- or while stuck in traffic and in need of something soothing.

First single and album opener “Chasing Pirates” indicates what one can expect from the album, especially with a strong musical background and Jones’ trademark strong vocals. It is understandable though that many will not like this track, as it evokes no memory of previous hits such as “Don’t Know Why.” Strong guitar elements are dominant over the traditional piano sound that fans of Jones have been used to, yet it seems to work somehow. In fact, the guitar theme is so dominant over the entirety of the album, that this could cause a rift amongst old and new fans. (more…)


Backstreet Boys being their awesome selves.

Backstreet Boys after becoming a quartet

I’ve been partial to the music of the Backstreet Boys ever since I was around 8 years old, and their album Millennium was on top of the charts everywhere. I have fond memories of attempting to do the choreography of Larger Than Life and Everybody without much success.

Eleven years later, I’m still listening to their music even though they’re well past their heyday. The Boys have grown up, gotten married, their dance moves are a bit rusty, lost one member, and generally (and sadly) failed to duplicate the success they had in the 90s. What they do have however, is a fanbase that refuses to admit all of the above, therefore they are still on the scene.

In October 2009, they presented the world with This Is Us, their 7th worldwide studio album, and their second without member Kevin Richardson. They called it a return to form, I called it an attempt to be current in a market that is ever so changing. And that’s coming from a true and tired fan. Even though I’ve played the tracks over and over, there isn’t anything remarkable about this effort, so you won’t appreciate it unless you are a fan of the boys. (more…)