Archive for the ‘Can’t Get It Out of Your Head’ Category


Album Cover for Roxette's Charm School (Image Via Wikipedia)

Although it is not set to be released  until April 18th, Roxette’s second single from their eighth studio album Charm School is destined to become a worldwide hit mainly because it reminds faithful fans of the band’s most famous songs from the 80s namely, It Must’ve Been Love and other songs from the Joyride age.

Many fans, like myself,  have taken to the internet to express their desire of having this song released as a single and thankfully, the duo have listened. No word on when and if a video will accompany the release, but regardless, this is a flawless song that can stand on its own, and can directly attract listeners despite its placement as the fourth track on the album, right after the very weak but enjoyable She’s Got Nothing On (But the Radio).

The Swedish duo, formed of Marie Fredriksson and Per Gessle have been making music for a while now but took a long, well-deserved ten-year break to work on their own projects and sadly, because Fredrikssion had brain cancer and has suffered some permanent damage to her cognitive abilities. Thankfully, she’s all better now and her vocal abilities are still intact, as demonstrated throughout the album.

Written and composed by Gessle, who is known to be a musical mastermind,  this song follows the tradition of vocals alternation that Roxette have been known for. Per’s smooth, lower register singing opens up the track, with Marie slightly doing back-up duties before the whole thing is transferred to her on the bridge. She does a stellar job here, with her contrasting high notes and incredible power in delivering the most important lines of the song. They continue to go back and forth, joining their voices together on the chorus to bring the whole song full circle.

Gessle does a great job in putting the music together. It’s definitely a rock song, with elements of electric guitar- especially at the end of the track as Fredriksson belts out the last note- drums, and some piano. The way he puts these together to make a fantastic rock-pop ballad is undoubtedly one of the strengths of this song. It’s no Listen to Your Heart however, but they’re not trying to do that anyways.

As for the lyrics, it’s about finding that one person who can be your consolance and hear you in times of distress, thus the speaker calls out to be spoken to about the significant other’s problems, with love, as the refrain keeps saying. Even though that person wants to hide, Fredrikission, in her very mighty voice, draws him near and eases him out of his vulnerability.

Would I recommend this song to someone who is just getting to know Roxette? Yes and No. Yes because the song is magnificent and such a breath of fresh air from everything we’re exposed today but no because they simply would not get what we’re all raving about. I would instead recommend that they take a listen to my ultimate favorite by this duo Listen to Your Heart or anything from their 80s body of work.

For fans of Roxette, this song will just reaffirm why we’ve fallen in love with Marie and Per and appreciate that a rare few make music like this today.


A greyscale illustration of a chimpanzee wearing a dress shirt, pants, and sunglasses. The animal is seen reclining, with his or her feet outstretched and in the foreground. In black, the words "The Lazy Song" appear in minuscule below the words "Bruno Mars" in majuscule font.

Single cover for Bruno Mars' The Lazy Song (Image via Wikipedia)

After he told you he loved you just the way you are, after he vowed to catch a grenade for you, after he jumped into a spur-of-the-moment-wedding with you, Bruno Mars now just wants to leave everything behind him, and have a long day at home doing, you guessed it, nothing.

Peter Hernandez, better known as Bruno Mars,  originally started off as a songwriter/producer in the Smeezingtons team, but has been flooding the airwaves since he collaborated with Travie McCoy on Billionaire in 2010. Though he’s vocally talented, I really can’t stand him because he’s pioneered “fiction-pop,” meaning that all of his songs have to do with something that won’t ever or very rarely come true. His latest single, now playing on all radio stations,  is no different.

Just like the title “The Lazy Song” suggests, the song is very laid back, mainly because its draws its elements from reggae music. It’s also heavily influenced by the general feel of Hawaii, where Mars hails from.

The guitar cords may seem very familiar because they’re very close to the ones he used on Billionaire and sounds very easy to play. Regardless of that, it’s still classified as a pop song because of it happens to be very catchy.

Unlike his past singles, Bruno makes no effort to hit any screechy high notes and just sticks to his simplistic approach towards things. This is a definite welcome change and keeps the song at its lovable state.

Lyrically, its fun and upbeat, and tackles on our everyday desire of just not being disturbed. As a college student, I can completely relate and there have been many, many days that I have felt this way or have stayed at home and not combed by hair.

He goes through all of the motions of a perfect lazy day like lying in bed, not picking up the phone, defying everyone, chilling, and being the king of his own castle- and that’s where his fiction pop kicks in. He’d rather blow off getting a college degree to be lazy- wow, that does not resonate well with me at all.

Though thew single has been released on February 15, the video is still not out yet, as is the case for Marry You, but I’ll be sure to keep you posted when it does. It’ll be very interesting to see how the approach he takes here is going to translate into visuals.

My final verdict? I really want to hate this song because it’s a Bruno Mars one and I really don’t like his style but it’s so catchy and spot-on that I’m very sure I’m going to keep replaying it over and over again as the summer approaches.

Here’s a clip of the song being performed acoustically via Billboard.com


Remember when the Black Eyed Peas used to be the hottest thing in hip-hop? I do. Their debut album Elephant was great because it

Black Eyed Peas performing.

Image via Wikipedia

gave us a memorable song by the name of  Where Is the Love? The song combined a fresh style with socially-conscious lyrics that made people re-evaluate the world they were living in, all in 4 or so minutes. The band, as is known, continued to be successful despite allegations of them plagarizing almost all their hits from other sources. Somewhere along the line, though, they went from being all about hip-hop into David Guetta‘s dream-project, as demonstrated by their last album The E.N.D, where their most successful song, at least in this country, I Gotta Feeling was produced by said person. So, bye bye hip-hop, and hello really cliche electronic music.

Well, they’re doing it again with this month’s release of *drum roll please, because really this is going to be a surprise* The Beginning, which judging by the album’s first single is going to be very, very much like it’s predesecor.

So let’s talk about that single, The Time (Dirty Bit) which is set to be released as a single just four days before the album (Really now? Smart marketing move BEP). (more…)


Eminem performing at the DJ hero party at June...

Image via Wikipedia

We here at TnT are huge Eminem fans, even before he made his amazingly successful album Recovery. We have previously reviewed Love The Way You Lie and No Love, both great songs in their own right, as well as their status as chart-toppers. We are therefore a bit perplexed about his most recent collaborations that are not up to his usual standard.

The first is a Part Deux of Love the Way You Lie, which will be featured on Rihanna‘s latest (and most probably lame, boring, non-creative) album Loud. This news should come as no shock to anyone familiar with how the music industry functions. Apparently, the fiery redhead (yes, she doesn’t seem to be giving up that color anytime soon) Barbadian doesn’t. As reported by MTV News, she was shocked that Eminem wanted to a follow up to their smash duet. Rihanna, sweetheart, it’s very simple. Once you make a hit record that gets a lot of buzz generated (mainly because you have Megan Fox in the video), you want to ride out the success for as long as you can.  How could you not know that with all the success you’ve had? (more…)


When I first heard Hurt’s Wonderful Life, I thought it was a song that the radio station had dug up from the late 80s and were bombarding us with because it was featured in some sort of movie or TV show. Then after some research, it turned out that it was only the band’s second single and was only released to the stations in August, and was met by much success in Europe mostly and I am not surprised.

This past year, I’ve only heard one other band that was successful at integrating synths in their music, and that was Hot Chip on their album One Life Stand but the newcomers Hurts will give the other band a run for their money in the next few years if they continue to do what they did with this song.

Basically, the song is about a man who is about to jump off a bridge until he meets Suzie who re-instigates hope in the man’s heart and falls in love with him along the way. The chorus is basically the very simple but also highly important message that Suzie tells the man:

Don’t let go

Never Give up

It’s such a wonderful life (more…)


Ever since TnT has started, I’ve been doing reviews of songs that are either newly released or that I’ve recently discovered. I’ve realized however that I’ve never shared the songs that I cannot get over no matter how old they get. Then a prompt I found on Plinky really set this in motion and so these are the three songs that no matter what happens, I cannot remove from my iPod or stop singing to myself.

  1. Truly, Madly, Deeply- Savage Garden (1997)

Off their debut self-titled album, this song cemented the Australian two-man band’s fame and presence in the pop music world, mainly because the song’s lyrics and melody struck a chord with almost all listeners across all generations. It doesn’t hurt either that its success can still be felt thirteen years after it’s release. You can’t help but swoon over the lyrics that Darren Hayes and Daniel Jones wrote, Hayes’s smooth voice, appropriate for this type of slow, romantic song, or the beautiful musical orchestration. With this song, the band played their cards right, even going as far to shoot two videos, the most popular of which in Paris, France, because accordingly it’s the most romantic city in the world. All these elements have made it my ultimate favorite song, and besides, what girl would not like to be at the receiving end of the following lines? (more…)


Single Cover

In 2005, Australian songstress Delta Goodrem paired with former Westlife member Brian McFadden to release Almost Here, a sort-of-ballad, that managed to do considerably well in the countries where it was released. The song, however,

would only mark the start of Goodrem and McFadden’s professional and personal (the two are engaged to be married) collaboration. After writing Together We Are One, a song Goodrem performed at the Opening Ceremony of the  Commonwealth Games in 2006, they went on to write several songs for Goodrem’s third album Delta. 

Now in 2010, McFadden has released his third solo album, entitled Wall of Soundz, a distinctly electro-pop offering that diverts from what he’s been known to offer. Despite that, the third single,  from the album, Mistakes featuring his leading lady, should not be missed. (more…)